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Author Topic: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer  (Read 920 times)

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Offline emerge

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2016, 04:22:19 PM »
"Slowdown"? 4.5% is smaller than 20%, but we're talking about retail sales history*, not production.
*note: excluding bars & restaurants :blink:

"After a spate of acquisitions, most notably that of Goose Island, ABI is the third-largest craft brewer in the country, Bernstein calculates." Wat? :blink: Buying a craft brewery doesn't make you a "craft brewer". ABI is a gigantor company.

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Offline borrowedladder

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2016, 12:25:08 PM »
The rate of increase year over year has been incredible until recently.  That is quite the drop.

Offline emerge

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2016, 12:55:40 PM »
The rate of increase year over year has been incredible until recently.  That is quite the drop.
Sure, but the numbers don't include sales in bars/restaurants, which is a huge industry. I'd guess that's where the growth is still happening rapidly. Retail always has it's ups & downs. Is it a sign of market saturation though, maybe so.

Offline KingG

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2016, 12:55:55 PM »
I think craft beer peaked last year.
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Offline howardf

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2016, 01:01:48 PM »
I think craft beer peaked last year.

Since it's your business, I think you'd know more than most of us.  For me, I've stopped buying much at retail other than easy drinkers that I'm going to sip at home.  Most of what I drink is on premises, preferably at the source.

Offline KingG

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2016, 01:23:45 PM »
I think craft beer peaked last year.

Since it's your business, I think you'd know more than most of us.
I guess I should have said, "I think craft beer peaked in San Diego last year."

The market is so over-saturated here it';s ridiculous. It doesn't even matter if you make good beer anymore, the attention span of the "new money" is less than a goldfish.
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Offline howardf

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2016, 01:32:02 PM »
I think craft beer peaked last year.

Since it's your business, I think you'd know more than most of us.
I guess I should have said, "I think craft beer peaked in San Diego last year."

The market is so over-saturated here it';s ridiculous. It doesn't even matter if you make good beer anymore, the attention span of the "new money" is less than a goldfish.

Pretty sure that's everywhere now.  We got Ballast Point, I was excited, bought GF Sculpin, Mango Even Keel, and some Victory at Sea.  There's still stuff from the original shipment sitting on shelves.

Offline rhoadsrage

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2016, 02:22:04 PM »
The more interesting question for me is "When will the craft beer saturation lead to price reductions?"  I have hear the arguments that ingredients are expensive, time bla bla bla.  But I see Lagunita's 6-ers for under $10 and bombers for $5 so I assume it is possible to turn a profit at that price. 

 Yes I know aging in pre-prohibition soy sauce barrels or using squirrel nut fruit is expensive but I think the next phase of craft beer will be some brands selling the standard line-up in the mid-range price.   Then the next phase will be the craft swill challenge.  Sugar Beet Ale fermented on barley hay is what the farm hands really had to drink,  Saison was for the farmer himself.   
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Offline mr. furley

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2016, 02:43:50 PM »
I see Lagunita's 6-ers for under $10 and bombers for $5 so I assume it is possible to turn a profit at that price. 
 

what were prices on Lagunitas beers like when they first hit retail? were they $5 then and didn't increase with inflation?
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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2016, 02:50:37 PM »
The more interesting question for me is "When will the craft beer saturation lead to price reductions?"  I have hear the arguments that ingredients are expensive, time bla bla bla.  But I see Lagunita's 6-ers for under $10 and bombers for $5 so I assume it is possible to turn a profit at that price. 

 Yes I know aging in pre-prohibition soy sauce barrels or using squirrel nut fruit is expensive but I think the next phase of craft beer will be some brands selling the standard line-up in the mid-range price.   Then the next phase will be the craft swill challenge.  Sugar Beet Ale fermented on barley hay is what the farm hands really had to drink,  Saison was for the farmer himself.

Surly has reduced the price of Coffee Bender by $2/4 pk among some other reductions.   :shrug:

Offline rhoadsrage

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Re: WSJ:Why Craft Brewing Slowdown Won’t Benefit Big Beer
« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2016, 03:11:42 PM »
The more interesting question for me is "When will the craft beer saturation lead to price reductions?"  I have hear the arguments that ingredients are expensive, time bla bla bla.  But I see Lagunita's 6-ers for under $10 and bombers for $5 so I assume it is possible to turn a profit at that price. 

 Yes I know aging in pre-prohibition soy sauce barrels or using squirrel nut fruit is expensive but I think the next phase of craft beer will be some brands selling the standard line-up in the mid-range price.   Then the next phase will be the craft swill challenge.  Sugar Beet Ale fermented on barley hay is what the farm hands really had to drink,  Saison was for the farmer himself.

Surly has reduced the price of Coffee Bender by $2/4 pk among some other reductions.   :shrug:

My plan is working.   jk
I actually remember that, not to long ago, and it did pick up some more Surly.  I only used Lagunita's because that is what popped into my head.  But I honestly was surprised that brewery's that make great beer would do it.  I was thinking more about the shock of seeing every new start up coming to the market with a run-of-the-mill beer coming in at the same price point just because "seems like everyone else is selling them at that price".   

Just as everything from wine to designer watches have a much wider range of pricing, I think beer prices are a bit bottle necked.
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