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Offline emerge

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Brewing with fresh hops
« on: August 14, 2015, 11:45:03 AM »
What are everyone's experiences brewing with fresh hops?

Is it more of a novelty, or is there genuinely a different taste/aroma profile than using dried whole cone hops?

Most of the commercial fresh hop beers i've had are just mild and grassy... which I realize have a much shorter shelf life.
Not a big fan of just adding grassy vegetal overtones. If drying them is just as good or better i'd rather do that.

Advice? Stories? TIA :ale:

Offline howardf

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2015, 01:00:27 PM »
I'm pretty sure it's a novelty, but it's one I enjoy.  I remember hearing 5-6:1 for fresh to dry ratio.

Offline ntz08

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2015, 01:16:14 PM »
i don't believe it's a novelty at all.  we make a cascade apa with fresh hops several years ago and it's pretty much why we planted hops.

made the same beer with whole leaf and while it's a good beer, the fresh hop version is superior. We still use a small amount of dried cascade for bittering, but all of the aroma addition are fresh (and homegrown).

I find that the floral and citrus notes especially are brighter and crisper when I use fresh hops. The hop flavor just pops significantly more.


Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2015, 01:26:08 PM »
I'm pretty sure it's a novelty, but it's one I enjoy.  I remember hearing 5-6:1 for fresh to dry ratio.
:thumbup:
I was thinking of just using the Columbus, which are ready now, but may need something else to balance.
There are a ton this year, i'd estimate at least over a pound right now, with a bunch more on the way.

I'll probably do a hop tea first to get a better idea of what they will taste/smell like.

i don't believe it's a novelty at all.  we make a cascade apa with fresh hops several years ago and it's pretty much why we planted hops.

made the same beer with whole leaf and while it's a good beer, the fresh hop version is superior. We still use a small amount of dried cascade for bittering, but all of the aroma addition are fresh (and homegrown).

I find that the floral and citrus notes especially are brighter and crisper when I use fresh hops. The hop flavor just pops significantly more.
Very cool to hear that :thumbup:
I wondered if I just haven't had a super fresh wet hop beer in recent memory... all have been commercial, very few on tap at a brewery that I can remember.

Offline skinnyguy

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2015, 11:33:08 AM »
I'm pretty sure it's a novelty, but it's one I enjoy.  I remember hearing 5-6:1 for fresh to dry ratio.
:thumbup:
I was thinking of just using the Columbus, which are ready now, but may need something else to balance.
There are a ton this year, i'd estimate at least over a pound right now, with a bunch more on the way.

I'll probably do a hop tea first to get a better idea of what they will taste/smell like.

i don't believe it's a novelty at all.  we make a cascade apa with fresh hops several years ago and it's pretty much why we planted hops.

made the same beer with whole leaf and while it's a good beer, the fresh hop version is superior. We still use a small amount of dried cascade for bittering, but all of the aroma addition are fresh (and homegrown).

I find that the floral and citrus notes especially are brighter and crisper when I use fresh hops. The hop flavor just pops significantly more.
Very cool to hear that :thumbup:
I wondered if I just haven't had a super fresh wet hop beer in recent memory... all have been commercial, very few on tap at a brewery that I can remember.

I go back and forth on fresh hopped beers. Sometimes I feel like it's a novelty, especially when the packaged hops are bright and fresh. Sometimes I feel like the fresh hops have a nice character. Because of the amount of green material you have to add, it can sometimes cause overly grassy flavors (sometimes reported as vegetal).

As mentioned, the general practice is to use dried hops for bittering for a couple reasons. The bittering potential of homegrown hops is unknown (the only way to have any idea is an expensive test), and that greatly reduces the amount of green material in the boil (which would lose its characteristic aroma anyway).

Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2015, 11:48:10 AM »
I'm pretty sure it's a novelty, but it's one I enjoy.  I remember hearing 5-6:1 for fresh to dry ratio.
:thumbup:
I was thinking of just using the Columbus, which are ready now, but may need something else to balance.
There are a ton this year, i'd estimate at least over a pound right now, with a bunch more on the way.

I'll probably do a hop tea first to get a better idea of what they will taste/smell like.

i don't believe it's a novelty at all.  we make a cascade apa with fresh hops several years ago and it's pretty much why we planted hops.

made the same beer with whole leaf and while it's a good beer, the fresh hop version is superior. We still use a small amount of dried cascade for bittering, but all of the aroma addition are fresh (and homegrown).

I find that the floral and citrus notes especially are brighter and crisper when I use fresh hops. The hop flavor just pops significantly more.
Very cool to hear that :thumbup:
I wondered if I just haven't had a super fresh wet hop beer in recent memory... all have been commercial, very few on tap at a brewery that I can remember.

I go back and forth on fresh hopped beers. Sometimes I feel like it's a novelty, especially when the packaged hops are bright and fresh. Sometimes I feel like the fresh hops have a nice character. Because of the amount of green material you have to add, it can sometimes cause overly grassy flavors (sometimes reported as vegetal).

As mentioned, the general practice is to use dried hops for bittering for a couple reasons. The bittering potential of homegrown hops is unknown (the only way to have any idea is an expensive test), and that greatly reduces the amount of green material in the boil (which would lose its characteristic aroma anyway).
This is more a question to everybody, what's the ideal way to use fresh hops?
I've read that adding in the boil destroys the more delicate oils they have, so i'm guessing to add at flameout or dry-hop in secondary?
(Disclaimer: i'm a brewing noob, and would just be "helping" a homebrewer friend.)

Offline skinnyguy

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2015, 09:41:30 AM »
This is more a question to everybody, what's the ideal way to use fresh hops?
I've read that adding in the boil destroys the more delicate oils they have, so i'm guessing to add at flameout or dry-hop in secondary?
(Disclaimer: i'm a brewing noob, and would just be "helping" a homebrewer friend.)

Definitely flameout or dry-hop would be good. Hop aromatics are volatile and can be easily lost during the boil. Primary can off-gas some of that as well, though the main reason to avoid adding the hops in there is the krausen (it would be very easy to clog your airlock, and you add heat by insulating the surface of the beer with a floating mass of hops). Most breweries tend to add them at flameout or during their whirlpool from what I've heard. I think the likelihood of adding a vegetal character is increased with fresh hops in secondary.

Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2015, 09:46:52 AM »
This is more a question to everybody, what's the ideal way to use fresh hops?
I've read that adding in the boil destroys the more delicate oils they have, so i'm guessing to add at flameout or dry-hop in secondary?
(Disclaimer: i'm a brewing noob, and would just be "helping" a homebrewer friend.)

Definitely flameout or dry-hop would be good. Hop aromatics are volatile and can be easily lost during the boil. Primary can off-gas some of that as well, though the main reason to avoid adding the hops in there is the krausen (it would be very easy to clog your airlock, and you add heat by insulating the surface of the beer with a floating mass of hops). Most breweries tend to add them at flameout or during their whirlpool from what I've heard. I think the likelihood of adding a vegetal character is increased with fresh hops in secondary.
Thanks for the helpful info :thumbup:
I just read about a "hop stand" technique after the boil, keeping it in the 120-160 range and allowing the hops to stand for 60 min or so with the lid closed to keep volatiles in. Maybe this and dry hopping only for a short period is the way to go.

Offline skinnyguy

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2015, 10:02:47 AM »
This is more a question to everybody, what's the ideal way to use fresh hops?
I've read that adding in the boil destroys the more delicate oils they have, so i'm guessing to add at flameout or dry-hop in secondary?
(Disclaimer: i'm a brewing noob, and would just be "helping" a homebrewer friend.)

Definitely flameout or dry-hop would be good. Hop aromatics are volatile and can be easily lost during the boil. Primary can off-gas some of that as well, though the main reason to avoid adding the hops in there is the krausen (it would be very easy to clog your airlock, and you add heat by insulating the surface of the beer with a floating mass of hops). Most breweries tend to add them at flameout or during their whirlpool from what I've heard. I think the likelihood of adding a vegetal character is increased with fresh hops in secondary.
Thanks for the helpful info :thumbup:
I just read about a "hop stand" technique after the boil, keeping it in the 120-160 range and allowing the hops to stand for 60 min or so with the lid closed to keep volatiles in. Maybe this and dry hopping only for a short period is the way to go.

Yeah, hop stands can be good. Depending on the chilling method, you might be able to combine that with chilling.

EDIT*- I think dry-hopping for 1-3 days is more than enough anyway. My opinion is that after a day or so, pretty much everything desirable is extracted already, and the hop flavor just gets muddled if left too much longer. I try to have my beer off the hops after 3 days.

The best amount of contact time is not set in stone, and people have different opinions on that. I've read experiment results that said everything dissolves within a week for both pellet and leaf hops. Two-thirds of the final concentration of oils is done in a day for leaf.

Temperature also affects dry hopping. Most commercial brewers dry-hop warm, right when fermentation is tailing off (not much bubbling is happening any more). Some recirculate for a day, then remove the hops and yeast. Some do not recirculate and give more contact time. I've read a few brewers that prefer cold hopping, but most do warm (60-70F).

There is discussion about the acids clinging to yeast particles and settling out, so some brewers like to wait until the beer is clearer. That may also add more long-lasting haze since the acids and proteins stick around.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2015, 10:33:36 AM by skinnyguy »

Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2015, 12:41:53 AM »
Waiting another week or so to brew, but in the meantime made a hop syrup for cocktails.

Half and half hop tea and honey. Let the tea steep for 40 min after boiling, it was super bitter on its own. Did a second steep for 15 min which was more manageable. Mixed in honey and stirred until dissolved. Worked well in small doses though the honey seemed to dominate. Would blend a 50% hop tea (40 min only) next time, if that makes sense.

Also, a handful of fresh hops in a mediocre beer works wonders...

Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2015, 11:03:37 AM »
It's finally brew day, woohoo!

I'm not sure what the totals will be, but i'm guessing Borrowedladder and I will pick at least 3 lbs. of fresh Columbus and Cascade to use.
Will weigh them out and report back... from what i've read it's not overkill to use 3 lbs. in a 5 gallon batch, does this sound rational/sane?
Thanks to Howard, Ntz08, and Skinnyguy for all the feedback and tips in this thread. :cheers:

Offline ntz08

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2015, 02:10:50 PM »
It's finally brew day, woohoo!

I'm not sure what the totals will be, but i'm guessing Borrowedladder and I will pick at least 3 lbs. of fresh Columbus and Cascade to use.
Will weigh them out and report back... from what i've read it's not overkill to use 3 lbs. in a 5 gallon batch, does this sound rational/sane?
Thanks to Howard, Ntz08, and Skinnyguy for all the feedback and tips in this thread. :cheers:

you're fine with 3 lbs, especially if you're not using any pellets/dried hops for bittering.  Are you bagging them up or just tossing them in?
They'll absorb quite a bit of liquid either way and you may want to try to gently squeeze some of it out if your volume comes up a bit low.

Have a good brew day :thumbup:

Been several years since our first 5 gal batch, but I think i did one early addition and then used most of it late/whirlpool. Only had ~2 lbs but it was good size cones of commercial fresh cascade. Could have easily used more. 

One or two years ago we did a 15-20 gal batch that used 3 oz dried and probably ~8 lbs of fresh but that was probably everything we could pick off the 2 vines we have.  This year, I think i had ~17 gal and used 3 oz dried whole-leaf for bittering, probably 5-6 lbs of fresh late, then dry-hopped for 5 days with about another lb. 

Kegged it last friday and ended up with ~0.75 gal extra.  Tasted so good even without carb that we put the pitcher into the fridge for a while and my buddy and i polished it off that night so it didn't go to waste. Can't wait to drink the finished product.

Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2015, 02:36:55 PM »
It's finally brew day, woohoo!

I'm not sure what the totals will be, but i'm guessing Borrowedladder and I will pick at least 3 lbs. of fresh Columbus and Cascade to use.
Will weigh them out and report back... from what i've read it's not overkill to use 3 lbs. in a 5 gallon batch, does this sound rational/sane?
Thanks to Howard, Ntz08, and Skinnyguy for all the feedback and tips in this thread. :cheers:

you're fine with 3 lbs, especially if you're not using any pellets/dried hops for bittering.  Are you bagging them up or just tossing them in?
They'll absorb quite a bit of liquid either way and you may want to try to gently squeeze some of it out if your volume comes up a bit low.

Have a good brew day :thumbup:

Been several years since our first 5 gal batch, but I think i did one early addition and then used most of it late/whirlpool. Only had ~2 lbs but it was good size cones of commercial fresh cascade. Could have easily used more. 

One or two years ago we did a 15-20 gal batch that used 3 oz dried and probably ~8 lbs of fresh but that was probably everything we could pick off the 2 vines we have.  This year, I think i had ~17 gal and used 3 oz dried whole-leaf for bittering, probably 5-6 lbs of fresh late, then dry-hopped for 5 days with about another lb. 

Kegged it last friday and ended up with ~0.75 gal extra.  Tasted so good even without carb that we put the pitcher into the fridge for a while and my buddy and i polished it off that night so it didn't go to waste. Can't wait to drink the finished product.
Thanks! Yeah, we'll be bagging them in a hop sock or something similar. The recipe calls for 1/2 oz. pellet hops for bittering.
Sounds like i'll be drying 10 oz. to have 2 oz. for dry-hopping after fermentation.

Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2015, 08:26:22 AM »
Wound up with 4 lbs., used 3 for late additions and 1 drying now for a dry hop after fermentation.

Offline Jaysus

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2015, 08:46:52 AM »
How did your volume turn out?

The Harrrrrvest Ale I am drinking now was intended to be a 10 gallon batch, I only would up with 9 after dryhopping - lol.


ETA: https://untappd.com/b/trubbel-brewing-harrrrrvest-ale-v2-0/1229710

Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2015, 09:43:15 AM »
How did your volume turn out?

The Harrrrrvest Ale I am drinking now was intended to be a 10 gallon batch, I only would up with 9 after dryhopping - lol.


ETA: https://untappd.com/b/trubbel-brewing-harrrrrvest-ale-v2-0/1229710
Looked like 4.5 gal. or so, an inch or two under the 5 gal. mark. Squeezed out the bags.
Would it be a bad idea to wring out the bag after dry hopping?

Offline Jaysus

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2015, 09:44:22 AM »
it couldn't hurt :shrug:  I dry hopped lose... it was a mess :lol:

Offline skinnyguy

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2015, 12:24:10 PM »
How did your volume turn out?

The Harrrrrvest Ale I am drinking now was intended to be a 10 gallon batch, I only would up with 9 after dryhopping - lol.


ETA: https://untappd.com/b/trubbel-brewing-harrrrrvest-ale-v2-0/1229710
Looked like 4.5 gal. or so, an inch or two under the 5 gal. mark. Squeezed out the bags.
Would it be a bad idea to wring out the bag after dry hopping?

I try not to squeeze the bag after dry hopping. I think it can extract flavors that seem overly fruity and muddled. That's anecdotal though.

Offline emerge

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2015, 12:52:00 PM »
How did your volume turn out?

The Harrrrrvest Ale I am drinking now was intended to be a 10 gallon batch, I only would up with 9 after dryhopping - lol.


ETA: https://untappd.com/b/trubbel-brewing-harrrrrvest-ale-v2-0/1229710
Looked like 4.5 gal. or so, an inch or two under the 5 gal. mark. Squeezed out the bags.
Would it be a bad idea to wring out the bag after dry hopping?

I try not to squeeze the bag after dry hopping. I think it can extract flavors that seem overly fruity and muddled. That's anecdotal though.
Good to know, I will pass that along. I think we're planning to do 2 separate dry-hop additions, one in the carboy, one in the keg.

Offline Jaysus

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #19 on: September 25, 2015, 01:42:18 PM »
I have had bad luck dry-hopping in the keg before.  Be sure to sting it up so that you can a) keep the dip tube from plugging and b) be able to pull them if they become to grassy.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #20 on: September 25, 2015, 01:53:43 PM »
I have had bad luck dry-hopping in the keg before.  Be sure to sting it up so that you can a) keep the dip tube from plugging and b) be able to pull them if they become to grassy.
Thanks, i'll pass that along too. Guessing we'll be using the same hop sack, so should be able to retrieve it ok without any particles getting out.
:fingerscrossed:

Offline ntz08

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2015, 02:19:46 PM »
i bought some gadget a while back (NHC maybe?) that replaces the diptube with a flexible tube that connects to a floating pickup/inlet. It worked pretty great for dry hopping in the keg. I'll be damned if i can remember the name of the vendor though

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2015, 10:03:33 PM »
Update on the harvest ale... My buddy said it's coming around, going to do a second round of dry hopping early next week.


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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2015, 05:37:41 PM »
Forgot to mention how it tasted... turned out good, a little underwhelming but really drinkable.
Had a fresh produce aroma, artichoke is what someone said. A little bit of melon flavor, clean light bitterness.
Overall it was good, but plan to use more Cascade next time.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #24 on: September 22, 2016, 08:16:37 PM »
So the plan is to do a wet-hopped kölsch this year, brewing Sunday.

Would dry-hopping with wet hops be alright for a day or two?
Trying to avoid vegetal flavors, planning a hop stand after flameout during the cooling stage.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2016, 11:15:19 AM »
Any opinions how long a hop stand with wet hops should be?
Someone advised 20 min., which seems on the short side.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2016, 12:28:27 PM »
Any opinions how long a hop stand with wet hops should be?
Someone advised 20 min., which seems on the short side.

had to look up 'hop stand' as i wasn't familiar with that term. normally refer to it as whirlpool/flameout additions.

i don't really clock it if i do one. depending on batch size, it's probably about 20-30 min to chill things down before xfer to fermenter and pitching yeast.

bunch of different theories (of course). this byo writeup from a few years back has more detailed info than i've seen in other places. says his are typically 45-60 min

http://byo.com/component/k2/item/2808-hop-stands

what hops are you using and are you doing a boil addition or is everything coming from the stand?

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #27 on: September 23, 2016, 12:37:06 PM »
Any opinions how long a hop stand with wet hops should be?
Someone advised 20 min., which seems on the short side.

had to look up 'hop stand' as i wasn't familiar with that term. normally refer to it as whirlpool/flameout additions.

i don't really clock it if i do one. depending on batch size, it's probably about 20-30 min to chill things down before xfer to fermenter and pitching yeast.

bunch of different theories (of course). this byo writeup from a few years back has more detailed info than i've seen in other places. says his are typically 45-60 min

http://byo.com/component/k2/item/2808-hop-stands

what hops are you using and are you doing a boil addition or is everything coming from the stand?
Good article, thanks :thumbup:
Fresh Cascade and Columbus, probably some pellets for mild bittering. We're doing an un-lagered Kölsch.
Trying to minimize the vegetal flavors from the wet hops.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2016, 01:12:21 PM »

Good article, thanks :thumbup:
Fresh Cascade and Columbus, probably some pellets for mild bittering. We're doing an un-lagered Kölsch.
Trying to minimize the vegetal flavors from the wet hops.

been a couple years since i did a kolsch, and without looking it up in beersmith, my memory of the fermentation is a bit fuzzy. I definitely remember cold-crashing it as everything i had read suggested this was a critical step to get the crispness and clarity that's characteristic of the style. kolsch recipes are typically pretty simple and hops are not at all a major element, while the fermentation is the key to the style.

since you're not really trying to brew to style, you have a lot more latitude with the recipe and hop additions.  just be aware that it will likely not have many of the characteristics of a traditional kolsch you may be hoping for. 

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #29 on: September 23, 2016, 03:59:56 PM »

Good article, thanks :thumbup:
Fresh Cascade and Columbus, probably some pellets for mild bittering. We're doing an un-lagered Kölsch.
Trying to minimize the vegetal flavors from the wet hops.

been a couple years since i did a kolsch, and without looking it up in beersmith, my memory of the fermentation is a bit fuzzy. I definitely remember cold-crashing it as everything i had read suggested this was a critical step to get the crispness and clarity that's characteristic of the style. kolsch recipes are typically pretty simple and hops are not at all a major element, while the fermentation is the key to the style.

since you're not really trying to brew to style, you have a lot more latitude with the recipe and hop additions.  just be aware that it will likely not have many of the characteristics of a traditional kolsch you may be hoping for.
The main idea is just to have a lighter base malt so the hops are showcased more. We plan to cold-crash but no cold storage/conditioning. Reading up on how to avoid sulfur notes from pilsner malt. IANAB (I am not a brewer) though, just the hops guy. :D

Offline ntz08

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #30 on: September 23, 2016, 04:50:22 PM »

Good article, thanks :thumbup:
Fresh Cascade and Columbus, probably some pellets for mild bittering. We're doing an un-lagered Kölsch.
Trying to minimize the vegetal flavors from the wet hops.

been a couple years since i did a kolsch, and without looking it up in beersmith, my memory of the fermentation is a bit fuzzy. I definitely remember cold-crashing it as everything i had read suggested this was a critical step to get the crispness and clarity that's characteristic of the style. kolsch recipes are typically pretty simple and hops are not at all a major element, while the fermentation is the key to the style.

since you're not really trying to brew to style, you have a lot more latitude with the recipe and hop additions.  just be aware that it will likely not have many of the characteristics of a traditional kolsch you may be hoping for.
The main idea is just to have a lighter base malt so the hops are showcased more. We plan to cold-crash but no cold storage/conditioning. Reading up on how to avoid sulfur notes from pilsner malt. IANAB (I am not a brewer) though, just the hops guy. :D

vigorous boil for 90 min uncovered and you should not have any issues with DMS from pilsner malt. and i wouldn't worry too much about off flavors from the hops.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #31 on: September 23, 2016, 04:56:57 PM »

Good article, thanks :thumbup:
Fresh Cascade and Columbus, probably some pellets for mild bittering. We're doing an un-lagered Kölsch.
Trying to minimize the vegetal flavors from the wet hops.

been a couple years since i did a kolsch, and without looking it up in beersmith, my memory of the fermentation is a bit fuzzy. I definitely remember cold-crashing it as everything i had read suggested this was a critical step to get the crispness and clarity that's characteristic of the style. kolsch recipes are typically pretty simple and hops are not at all a major element, while the fermentation is the key to the style.

since you're not really trying to brew to style, you have a lot more latitude with the recipe and hop additions.  just be aware that it will likely not have many of the characteristics of a traditional kolsch you may be hoping for.
The main idea is just to have a lighter base malt so the hops are showcased more. We plan to cold-crash but no cold storage/conditioning. Reading up on how to avoid sulfur notes from pilsner malt. IANAB (I am not a brewer) though, just the hops guy. :D

vigorous boil for 90 min uncovered and you should not have any issues with DMS from pilsner malt. and i wouldn't worry too much about off flavors from the hops.
Cool, sounds good :thumbup:
Last year we had some vegetal/overripe produce notes, but some fresh hops were added towards the end of the boil.
Hoping to avoid that by only doing the hop stand when it gets down to 175-180º for 30-40 min or so.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #32 on: September 24, 2016, 08:32:15 AM »
Good talk to you last nite Matt, A-A-Ron.  Looks like your in good hands.   Hop stands are much better than a hop back, and I like to add at flame out, aswell.  When large breweries add beer in the post boil stages it takes a good bit longer for the beer to drain so their is more exposure time to the hops.  That was the theory that started hop standing in homebrewing so simulate that effect on a smaller scale. 

The only other options you have are building a Randal  and First Wort Hoping (FWH) http://beersmith.com/blog/2012/11/19/first-wort-hops-fwh-in-beer-revisited/ where you throw them hops in the wort before the boil and let them boil the hole time, I have also wanted to pack them in the lauter tun before putting the grain bed in.   By some yet to be fully explained by science reason, it has similar but not quite the same as late addition hops.  It's also a nice way to keep some of the spend hops out of your beer, giving you a higher volume of beer.   

I don't use hop socks as often anymore, just because the beer can't flow the hops so there is not as much absorption from the hops, and they float with wet hops in them.   I only do 6 gal batches so I can just pour the pot through a sanitized s.s sieve into the carboy.  I have also used 2 hop socks and divided the hops in half as to not over fill. 

For some reference on how many hops to add, here is a Pliny younger clone hop schedule for dry hops: 

35ml Hop Extract @ 90
5ml Hop Extract @ 45
.35oz CTZ @ 45
1.5oz Simcoe @ 30
1.5oz Centennial @ 0
1.5oz Amarillo @ 0
2.5oz Simcoe @ 0

Fermenting  around 65F

Dry Hop 1: .5oz ea: Amarillo, Simcoe, Centennial
Dry Hop 2: 1oz ea: Amarillo, Centenial
Dry Hop 3: 1oz ea: Simcoe, CTZ
Dry Hop 4: .5oz ea Amarillo, Simcoe
"Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth."  --Mike Tyson

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #33 on: September 24, 2016, 01:09:14 PM »
Nice chatting with you too :cheers:
Thanks for the brewing advice, I passed it along. :thumbup:
Just sort of flying by the seat of our pants, so everything is useful.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #34 on: September 26, 2016, 10:09:58 AM »
We ended up doing a blonde ale with pilsner malt instead of the kölsch, with Galena, Columbus, and Amarillo for bittering.
Used 1 lb. each of fresh Cascade & Columbus for a 30 min. hop stand as it cooled down, starting around 165º.
We reserved a small amount of the wort to taste, and it was pretty fruity and hoppy, with no vegetal flavors, so it's already showing some promise.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #35 on: October 10, 2016, 05:48:45 PM »
We ended up doing a blonde ale with pilsner malt instead of the kölsch, with Galena, Columbus, and Amarillo for bittering.
Used 1 lb. each of fresh Cascade & Columbus for a 30 min. hop stand as it cooled down, starting around 165º.
We reserved a small amount of the wort to taste, and it was pretty fruity and hoppy, with no vegetal flavors, so it's already showing some promise.
Added a couple oz. of dry Cascade in the carboy, should be ready end of this week...

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #36 on: October 28, 2016, 12:06:10 PM »
We ended up doing a blonde ale with pilsner malt instead of the kölsch, with Galena, Columbus, and Amarillo for bittering.
Used 1 lb. each of fresh Cascade & Columbus for a 30 min. hop stand as it cooled down, starting around 165º.
We reserved a small amount of the wort to taste, and it was pretty fruity and hoppy, with no vegetal flavors, so it's already showing some promise.
Added a couple oz. of dry Cascade in the carboy, should be ready end of this week...
Did a test-flight a week after bottling, tasting really good. Fairly subtle but with a light bitterness, honeydew melon flavor, minimal vegetal quality.
It had a slight sweetness, which I assume is the priming sugar that hasn't fermented out yet?
After 2 wks i'm hoping that will be gone.

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #37 on: October 28, 2016, 02:46:50 PM »
We ended up doing a blonde ale with pilsner malt instead of the kölsch, with Galena, Columbus, and Amarillo for bittering.
Used 1 lb. each of fresh Cascade & Columbus for a 30 min. hop stand as it cooled down, starting around 165º.
We reserved a small amount of the wort to taste, and it was pretty fruity and hoppy, with no vegetal flavors, so it's already showing some promise.
Added a couple oz. of dry Cascade in the carboy, should be ready end of this week...
Did a test-flight a week after bottling, tasting really good. Fairly subtle but with a light bitterness, honeydew melon flavor, minimal vegetal quality.
It had a slight sweetness, which I assume is the priming sugar that hasn't fermented out yet?
After 2 wks i'm hoping that will be gone.
With homebrew, it gets to the sweet spot of drinking right about the time you only have a 6er left. 
"Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth."  --Mike Tyson

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #38 on: October 28, 2016, 03:19:08 PM »
We ended up doing a blonde ale with pilsner malt instead of the kölsch, with Galena, Columbus, and Amarillo for bittering.
Used 1 lb. each of fresh Cascade & Columbus for a 30 min. hop stand as it cooled down, starting around 165º.
We reserved a small amount of the wort to taste, and it was pretty fruity and hoppy, with no vegetal flavors, so it's already showing some promise.
Added a couple oz. of dry Cascade in the carboy, should be ready end of this week...
Did a test-flight a week after bottling, tasting really good. Fairly subtle but with a light bitterness, honeydew melon flavor, minimal vegetal quality.
It had a slight sweetness, which I assume is the priming sugar that hasn't fermented out yet?
After 2 wks i'm hoping that will be gone.
With homebrew, it gets to the sweet spot of drinking right about the time you only have a 6er left.
:(
I feel like it's already been way too long from brew day to drinking, especially for a wet-hop beer. (1 month)

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Re: Brewing with fresh hops
« Reply #39 on: October 04, 2017, 03:05:07 PM »
Brewed a "NE IPA" this year and added an oz. of cryo Citra and dry-hopping with 3 oz. of dried Cascades.
Had to dry everything this year due to aphids, but managed to salvage a couple lbs. for brewing.