search

Author Topic: Strawberry Chocolate Stout  (Read 2284 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wisconsinbeer1

  • VIP Member
  • Trade Count: (5)
  • Double IPA
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,348
  • Location: Nunya, Bizniss
  • 40 oz. to Freedom
Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« on: January 12, 2015, 10:49:46 PM »
My wife and a friend want me to brew a stout with strawberries and chocolate. Ive never used either in a beer. Doing a five gallon batch. Any suggestions? Puree strawberries? Freeze strawberries? Cocoa powder? Dark chocolate? In during boil? In during secondary? How much of each? Thanks in advance.
“Great ballplayers drink Lite beer because it’s less filling. I know. I asked one.” -Bob Uecker

Online howardf

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (4)
  • Barleywine
  • *****
  • Posts: 19,660
  • Location: Avon, IN
  • If I've offended you, it made me happy.
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2015, 11:05:38 PM »
I'm pretty sure strawberry flavor is extremely hard to get in a beer.  I've never used either, good luck!

Offline wisconsinbeer1

  • VIP Member
  • Trade Count: (5)
  • Double IPA
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,348
  • Location: Nunya, Bizniss
  • 40 oz. to Freedom
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2015, 11:14:49 PM »
Yea thats what im mainly aftaid of. Might just do a three gallon batch so the strawberries will go further.
“Great ballplayers drink Lite beer because it’s less filling. I know. I asked one.” -Bob Uecker

Offline jmu500

  • VIP Member
  • Trade Count: (6)
  • Quadrupel
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,395
  • Location: Lowell, MA
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2015, 09:09:47 AM »
If you want a strawberry flavor/aroma in the beer you need to use strawberry extract at bottling. Add some, taste and so on until you get the strawberry flavor you are looking for.

Offline Jaysus

  • TBS Founding Member
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Double IPA
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,614
  • Location: H'burg, PA
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2015, 11:43:05 AM »
The real pay off will be at serving time when you pair it with actual chocolate covered strawberries ;)

Chocolate malt in the gain bill is a must, maybe a strawberry in the mash (just to say you did it) and the strawberry extract at bottling.  I do not have any suggestions on actually using chocolate, but I have to think you want it in the kettle.  A GB of mine uses a fancy chocolate syrup in his 10BBL batches... pretty sure he adds lactose too. 

Online howardf

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (4)
  • Barleywine
  • *****
  • Posts: 19,660
  • Location: Avon, IN
  • If I've offended you, it made me happy.
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2015, 01:19:54 PM »
I would definitely put some lactose in there, just to have some residual sweetness to go with the berries.

Offline Jaysus

  • TBS Founding Member
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Double IPA
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,614
  • Location: H'burg, PA
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2015, 02:09:06 PM »
Some advice from a pro brewer:

"I’d go frozen strawberries after primary, 2lbs/gallon for a stout. For 2 weeks at least, stirring once a day for contact. Also use 1-2 lbs cacao nibs same amount of time so they get stirred too. Then see if you need extracts."

"Can def add a pound of lactose for sweetness"


I asked if the Nibs should go in secondary too....

"No secondary, lol. End of primary. No one likes to clean ;-)"

"Do it in a 6g bucket so you have room for everything"


He's a fruit beer guy, and my goto for all things beer and fruit.

Offline ntz08

  • VIP Member
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Quadrupel
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,483
  • Location: Bethlehem, PA
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2015, 04:50:16 PM »
The nibs are probably a better approach.

I've used dutch cocoa powder as a late kettle addition before and that batch had a insane krausen that never fell. I've also seen people say that they had little to no krausen with the powder.


Offline wisconsinbeer1

  • VIP Member
  • Trade Count: (5)
  • Double IPA
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,348
  • Location: Nunya, Bizniss
  • 40 oz. to Freedom
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2015, 05:28:10 PM »
Really appreciate the help everyone and jaysus that was really cool to see what a pro would do. Thanks a bunch. Think were just going to do a three gallon batch with four or five lbs of strawberries and use cocoa nibs. Really like the lactose idea as well. Then taste at bottling and add some strawberry extract if needed.
“Great ballplayers drink Lite beer because it’s less filling. I know. I asked one.” -Bob Uecker

Offline pwoods

  • Trade Count: (2)
  • Double IPA
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,453
  • Location: Cincinnati
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2015, 10:58:01 PM »
Some advice from a pro brewer:

"I’d go frozen strawberries after primary, 2lbs/gallon for a stout. For 2 weeks at least, stirring once a day for contact. Also use 1-2 lbs cacao nibs same amount of time so they get stirred too. Then see if you need extracts."

"Can def add a pound of lactose for sweetness"


I asked if the Nibs should go in secondary too....

"No secondary, lol. End of primary. No one likes to clean ;-)"

"Do it in a 6g bucket so you have room for everything"


He's a fruit beer guy, and my goto for all things beer and fruit.
I would not stir your fermented beer at all in fear of oxidation.

I've preferred puree over frozen, but it doesn't make much of a difference... just easier to use, imo.  2 or more lbs/gal sounds good since strawberries are pretty subtle in beer but you can always use extract later(make sure you taste it first since a lot of extracts taste like shit).  Add the puree/frozen while there is still a little activity in primary so the yeast start chewing it right away but doesn't blow off much flavor/aroma.  1lb of nibs should be good with the chocolate malt. 

I don't like lactose very much, and there's already plenty going on in a chocolate strawberry stout, so I'd leave it out.  If you still want additional sweetness and body, you can go with some additional Crystal 10-20 or Honey malt, or even Abbey malt or Special B.  Or try using a low attenuating English strand that doesn't ferment Maltrotriose.  If just body, Carapils/Carafoam or Maltodextrin.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2015, 11:48:44 AM by pwoods »

Offline Jaysus

  • TBS Founding Member
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Double IPA
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,614
  • Location: H'burg, PA
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2015, 09:01:13 AM »
Some advice from a pro brewer:

"I’d go frozen strawberries after primary, 2lbs/gallon for a stout. For 2 weeks at least, stirring once a day for contact. Also use 1-2 lbs cacao nibs same amount of time so they get stirred too. Then see if you need extracts."

"Can def add a pound of lactose for sweetness"


I asked if the Nibs should go in secondary too....

"No secondary, lol. End of primary. No one likes to clean ;-)"

"Do it in a 6g bucket so you have room for everything"


He's a fruit beer guy, and my goto for all things beer and fruit.
I would not stir your fermented beer at all in fear of oxidation.
OK.
No: open bucket, sick in spoon, stir
Sure: pick up bucket and agitate in a by swirling

Offline braconid

  • VIP Member
  • Trade Count: (12)
  • Old Ale
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,570
  • Location: Far from urbanization
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2015, 09:58:22 PM »
I used about 3 pounds of fresh strawberries that I froze and macerated per gallon of a berliner.  The nose is pretty good but the flavor is mild at best.  Strawberry is just hard to get through in the flavor for sure.

Offline skinnyguy

  • Trade Count: (2)
  • Pale Ale
  • ***
  • Posts: 387
  • Location: Minneapolis
Re: Strawberry Chocolate Stout
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2015, 04:51:38 PM »
It's almost always best to use frozen fruit. Even if you have fresh fruit from your garden, freeze it before using in the beer. Doing so helps rupture the cell walls, allowing the fruit to be broken down more easily.